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Questions and answers from all three mayoral candidates in 2022

What three attributes do you consider to be Flagstaff’s greatest assets and why? How would you use your position to maintain and strengthen these attributes?

Becky Daggett

A significant portion of residents are invested in our community and are actively engaged in making it stronger. City staff and council rely on this volunteer expertise for assistance and for help implementing smart policies.

The educational and scientific institutions and expertise in Flagstaff create many opportunities: cultural, economic, conservation, and policy.

The number of locally owned businesses make our community unique and stronger. These businesses are critical to our economic health and community vitality.

As Mayor I will continue my record of listening to all voices and seeking out expertise within our community to help me make good decisions.

 

Paul Deasy

  1. Our People – I love that walking down the street, strangers nod, smile, and say hello. Inclusivity, and ensuring people feel welcome, is critical in this position. I am the council liaison to the Diversity Awareness Commission and Inclusive and Adaptive Living Commission, and have pushed to revise our Civil Rights ordinance, which we are in the process of doing.
  2. Natural Environment – People come to Flagstaff because of the natural beauty of our environment. We must protect our natural environment and adapt to the new reality of climate change, which is why wildfire and flood protection has been, and will continue to be, a top priority of mine.
  3. Education – Flagstaff has the highest educational attainment of any city in Arizona, and we have many great educational opportunities from pre-k through college and beyond.

 

Daniel Williamson

  • The people of Flagstaff! Flagstaff citizens and our diversity creates a beautiful sense of community and responsibility to one another. 2) Flagstaff’s culture! The ethos of our city deserves to be protected and celebrated. It (ethos) is a reflection of so many creative, varying experiences and walks of life that span generations. 3) Flagstaff’s future! While I believe we are at a crossroads in many ways, I am full of optimism that we as a city will begin to see smart and healthy growth that promotes the health of our city and citizens! I will use my position as mayor to ensure that the greatest resource Flagstaff has – its people, from young to old, will be at the forefront of my decision and policy making process!

 

Flagstaff’s 10-Year Housing Plan and Carbon Neutrality Plan both call for incorporating appropriate density into residential neighborhoods and reducing parking minimums to meet their respective goals. What is your opinion of the value of increased density and reduced parking minimums?

Becky Daggett

Density, parking minimums, transportation, and diversifying housing types must be planned in coordination because each impacts the other. Implementing shared solutions to both challenges can lead to a stronger, healthier, and more connected Flagstaff.

Higher density housing, known as “missing middle housing,” not only affects affordability but can also lower our community’s carbon footprint by increasing the walkability of neighborhoods.

Reducing parking minimums is tied to transportation options other than cars being readily available and attractive. Diversity of transportation options is tied to appropriate density. Climate action that creates lively and strong neighborhoods can help solve the Housing Emergency, too.

 

Paul Deasy

Density is a natural and important part of growth, but we must be strategic. Too often our electeds go to either extreme—no growth or growth at any cost. I have a record of aligning with the Planning & Zoning Commission’s assessment of city code and not giving developers special favors. To increase density, change our code and regional plan rather than waiving the rules.

Decreasing parking minimums without proper infrastructure can create more problems, pushing vehicles into neighborhoods. This City Council has prioritized funding for bike/ped infrastructure and is helping to expand our bus system, so people don’t need to park a car in the first place.


Daniel Williamson

I certainly see the value of increased density and parking minimums; however, it must be done very strategically and thoughtfully to ensure it is realistic, sustainable, and beneficial for each community and neighborhood.

 

How would you balance the competing needs of drivers, pedestrians and cyclists and what emphasis would you put on vehicle access versus alternative modes of transportation in local transportation projects?

Becky Daggett

Multi-modal transportation depends on development patterns that facilitate its creation. Historically, Flagstaff’s transportation investments have favored the movement of cars. Increasing investment in cycling, walking, and transit infrastructure benefits all residents as the ease of accomplishing even some daily tasks without a car eases movement for the remaining cars. I’ve been an advocate of investment in multiple modes of transportation and will continue to advocate for transportation that operates as a system and allows for mobility of people of all ages and abilities.

 

Paul Deasy

We’ve prioritized vehicles for too long, and our infrastructure shows that. We have a lot of work to do to rethink road designs and ensure bike/ped safety and comfortability is at the forefront. That’s why across the city we’ve been reviewing intersection designs to change and expand bike/ped infrastructure. We must recognize though that this isn’t necessarily an “either/or” when it comes to bike/ped safety and traffic flow. We have the ability, for example, to build the voter-mandated Lone Tree bridge, while having a fully separated bike lane over the tracks and improving the respective intersections to be safer for bicyclists.

 

Daniel Williamson

Balancing the needs of drivers, pedestrians and cyclists is not a citywide competition, rather found in specific areas of our city. We need to focus on those areas with balanced, community minded conversations with accurate data, to meet the “area specific” needs are necessary prior to any decisions being made. I do believe we need to increase our access to alternative modes of transportation ensuring that people have their transportation needs met.

With that, this partially is an issue of equity and accessibility.  Balancing the needs of transportation, requires us to focus on the issue of workforce housing.

 

The city of Flagstaff recently partnered with Terros Health to launch the CARE unit, an alternative-response model to replace police in matters that don’t pose a threat to public safety.  What is your opinion about this model as a means to supplement traditional policing methods? What additional ways can we reduce the incarceration of the homeless and mentally ill and better serve these individuals?

Becky Daggett

I participated in the committee discussions of alternate responses to some public safety calls from the time I was elected Vice Mayor until I had to resign to run for Mayor. I remained part of this effort through Council’s approval and budgeting for our alternate response and contract award to Terros Health. I’m a strong supporter of the “Housing First” model as research demonstrates that crime rates decrease when previously unsheltered individuals become housed. Expanding the City’s alternate response model and prioritizing housing can help reduce incarceration and serve our community’s most vulnerable residents.

Paul Deasy

This was my #1 priority walking in as mayor, and I am proud of our team’s efforts to get this off the ground so quickly. The City of Flagstaff is now involved more heavily than ever in addressing mental health and substance use issues in our community than ever before. We have dedicated nearly $5 million in the last year to the cause.

Councilmember Shimoni and I are pushing to expand the CARE program to include a peer support specialist as well as scaling it to more units. We also must expand housing services for our unsheltered. Recognizing this, we have allocated record levels of funding for housing this last year.

Daniel Williamson

I believe the program has potential and I applaud the work being done thus far. It does deserve and require, for the health and safety of each person on each call, need to be under close scrutiny and supervision.  I do believe this is one step, in what I see as a multi-step approach to addressing this community issue.

 

The 10-year Housing Plan has a goal to reduce the current affordable housing need in our community by half over the next ten years. Do you think that this goal is feasible? What local and state strategies would you pursue to address Flagstaff’s affordable housing needs?

Becky Daggett

It’s feasible if our community demonstrates the will to accomplish it and affordable housing becomes a higher state and federal priority. State laws prevent the City of Flagstaff from enacting some affordable housing strategies that we might otherwise utilize. We can, however, provide incentives for inclusion of affordable units, can partner with non-profit and for-profit developers on city-owned land, and prioritize affordable housing through the budget process. Short of changing State law (which I also advocate), utilizing Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) is a state strategy that we should continue to support.


Paul Deasy

It is feasible, but the City of Flagstaff cannot do it alone. We need the state and federal government to assist. At the local level, the city is helping to convert motels into studio apartments. Homeownership is key though, and the model Habitat for Humanity has begun provides tiny homes that help people build equity. These city partnerships are critical to address our housing crisis.

At the state level, we have many preemptions. We need these removed so we can regulate short-term rentals and implement inclusionary zoning, which requires large developments to provide affordable housing. I am a board member on the Executive Board of the Arizona League of Cities and Towns, where we work collectively to regain local control over policy decisions, especially housing.

Daniel Williamson

The current plan as I see it currently written be difficult to achieve. We need to remove punitive requirements from developers and builders that increase bottom lines on the housing market. I would look intently into every option, local, state, and federal to pursue a more affordable housing market, both rental and ownership.

Additionally, in considering the accessibility to affordable housing, this must be a shared responsibility of each neighborhood, rather than a select few.

I would provide the leadership necessary, local, regional, and statewide to address this issue.

 

What strategies do you think are essential to securing an adequate water supply as Flagstaff grows? What is your opinion specifically of the Red Gap Ranch project and proposals to increase our drinking water supply with treated wastewater (potable reuse)?

Becky Daggett

A pipeline from Red Gap Ranch to Flagstaff will be expensive and there currently isn’t any funding identified. I support exploring all proposals that show promise of being feasible, safe, and within our reach economically. This includes additional conservation measures and potentially the treatment and reuse of wastewater. I’m open-minded about a future possibility of utilizing groundwater from Red Gap Ranch after we’ve accomplished additional conservation and possibly reuse projects.


Paul Deasy

Red Gap Ranch is a monstrously expensive project that the city cannot afford without massive federal investment, and inevitably it is “sticking another straw” into the same aquifer. Potable reuse is not an “if” but a “when.” The water in our region is at historic lows, and we are not seeing any abatement. The earth is warming, and we will have to adapt through technological advancement.

Daniel Williamson

There are currently some amazing efforts to secure the water necessary for smart growth being done by local and county governments across Northern Arizona. I would increase collaborative efforts to ensure Flagstaff has access to water. Regarding the Red Gap Ranch, that was decided by voter initiative in 2004, to ensure that the future of Flagstaffs water would be preserved. Having access to the water (whether we utilize it or not) gives us leverage to honor the agreements of the past as well as ensure that we have the ability to access water in the future.

 

Do you support Flagstaff’s Climate Emergency Declaration and the Carbon Neutrality Plan that was developed to assist the city in achieving carbon neutrality by 2030? Explain in detail why or why not.

Becky Daggett

Yes. I publicly advocated for the Declaration and voted in support of the Carbon Neutrality Plan. Residents of Flagstaff are already experiencing negative impacts from climate change. Drought, increasing intensity of catastrophic wildfire, flooding resulting from these fires, decreased air quality, and increasing discomfort in many of our homes from rising summer temperatures. These impacts will continue to intensify, and we’ll increasingly become a haven for “climate refugees” from areas impacted even more by rising temperatures. Not adapting to these impacts will result in our declining quality of life and negative impacts to our community’s health and safety.


Paul Deasy

I absolutely support the Carbon Neutrality Plan. Cities can be a part of the problem, or they can also be part of the solution. We clearly won’t put a huge dent in climate change just by ourselves, but being a leader shows other cities it can be done. Flagstaff has become a major leader on climate action and adaptation, and many are looking to us to set their own policies and budgets. Sustainability is at the forefront of our policy and budgetary considerations. We recently rose Sustainability to a division-level status, expanded personnel, and for the first time ever, our Sustainability Director was on the budget committee.

Daniel Williamson

I support the concept of the Carbon Neutrality Plan, however, as it is currently written, it will be difficult to achieve due to several factors, including;  1) a Two Hundred Million Dollar plan without the voters full knowledge and input, 2) With the obvious unknowns of interstate and highway traffic volume, various trains and the certainty of wildfires, and, 3) the lack of focus on housing, allowing workers to live where they work, rather than traveling from the surrounding communities.

What is your opinion of the draft Active Transportation Management Plan? How would you ensure adequate funding to implement the specific bike and pedestrian improvement projects outlined in the plan?

Becky Daggett

I support the plan and appreciate the help and expertise that so many in our community provided to its drafting and input given during the public comment period. We provide adequate funding first by prioritizing increased investment in bike and pedestrian improvement projects locally and actively seeking state and federal funding. Flagstaff has a strong track record of successful partnerships with regional, state, and federal agencies and organizations. These partnerships are critical to completing our future projects.

Paul Deasy

Transportation is one of the top drivers of climate change, and the ATMP is a critical document to reduce our carbon footprint. I think the Active Transportation Management Plan is a must to get cars off the road and provide a safe and comfortable environment for people to get out of their vehicles. We are already redirecting our transportation sales tax dollars towards bike/ped projects, but it is not enough. Properly funding the ATMP will likely take a bond measure on the ballot.

Daniel Williamson

Walking and biking are essential to Flagstaff for a variety of reasons most of which are stated in the ATMP.  The city of Flagstaff’s budget is a reflection of our shared values as a community, a consensus document that ultimately is created by the citizens and voted on by the council.

We can ensure alternative modes of transportation are all throughout our city, invest monies, all without the certainty that people will utilize them or have access to them. 

If we would address the issue of workforce housing with a meaningful approach, we would find that people would more greatly embrace alternative modes of transportation.  However, as our current reality shows, there are a number of factors that negatively impact our resident’s ability to utilize alternative modes of transportation.

 

In Flagstaff, our indigenous community has been marginalized for centuries. Nationally, some groups are trying to limit the teaching of the history of Black people and the rights of LGBTQ individuals. How do you think these histories should inform local policy decisions? How would you ensure that Flagstaff is an inclusive and welcoming community?

Becky Daggett

Continually teach these histories locally and prioritize inclusion of diverse voices in policy decisions. I support efforts already undertaken, including: creation of the Coordinator for Indigenous Initiatives position and the Indigenous Commission; the Lived Black Experience programming; and the Civil Rights Ordinance, for which I publicly advocated. This isn’t enough. We need more diverse representation on the City’s commissions, council, and staff. I have actively sought out individuals with backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives different than mine in hopes of building relationships and seeking input as this is a priority for me. 

Paul Deasy

Flagstaff is in the process of rewriting our local Civil Rights ordinance to create better protections. The City of Flagstaff created a new position a couple of years for an Indigenous Coordinator, and we continue to contract with Black Lived Experience to better inform the public and Council when we form public policy. Issues of equity are embedded in so many of our public policy decisions. Decades of lagging infrastructural investment in our historically Black, Hispanic, and Native American neighborhoods means we have a lot of ground to make up, and we are doing just that. Broadband grants and stormwater infrastructure investments have been focusing on our historically neglected neighborhoods, most especially Sunnyside and Southside.

Daniel Williamson

While this is an incredible question, it highlights and speaks to our need to thoroughly address colonialism in every form necessary. The unfortunate fact is that our country and our city has historically and erroneously marginalized groups of people for centuries. It is up to us, collectively to do better. I support people, all people equally. I have come to the conclusion that each person’s real, lived experience has great value and that value should be taken into great consideration to any and all discussion at the dais. Personally, I have dedicated my life to serving people – all people, as well as inviting and welcoming them to share the space that I am in.

 

What are your three greatest concerns regarding Flagstaff’s future and what steps would you take to help address them?

Becky Daggett

Safe, decent, and affordable housing is a vital part of Flagstaff’s infrastructure and a basic human need. I helped to create the City’s 10-Year Housing Plan and I will work hard to implement it.

I prioritize forest health and addressing climate change through an equity lens, thus ensuring we help the most vulnerable in our community become as climate adapted as possible.

If we aren’t decisive in our efforts to address affordable housing, climate change, and job creation, I’m concerned we will suffer diminished economic, ethnic, cultural, and ecological diversity. I’m committed to ensuring Flagstaff is increasingly diverse and vibrant.

Paul Deasy

  1. Wildfire and Flooding – We have been cutting through red tape left and right to get projects funded and implemented. Through strong partnerships with 5 other government agencies, we have secured $15 million to address Museum Fire scar flooding, most of which was funded, designed, and completed in only 9 months. We purchased new ladder trucks, radio systems, and are planning to purchase more wildfire vehicles this coming year. We also rose firefighter pay 5.9% on average this year.
  2. Housing – We have been cutting red tape here also, expediting processes and providing record-level funding for affordable housing. We are fully in with the new model of converting old motels into studio apartments and are excited about Housing Solutions and Flagstaff Shelter Services spearheading these efforts.

    3. Water – Technically, the city has a 100-year water supply designation, but that assumes using Red Gap Ranch, pumping it uphill 2,500 feet at 5x the electricity needed to get to homes. We have to start rethinking the longevity of our water and consider new technologies.

Daniel Williamson

It all comes back to people for me – there is a growing divisiveness and US against US situation that I observe. I will work to unify and celebrate the diversity for those who call Flagstaff home. For me, it is not only about housing, transportation, and carbon neutrality, if we accomplish every objective, yet have a divided city where we live afraid and suspicious or our neighbors, we have accomplished very little. This is about WE THE PEOPLE. I will work hard to return us to that truth, that deep sense of belonging and community. All while developing a deeper respect as we work together, amidst our differences.